Follow Us Online:

(888) 860-5114


Find Us

200 East Hobbs St., Athens, AL 35611

Map & Directions

Patient Education

Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus

 

 

Dental Affordable Plan

Smile Gallery

Botox Cosmetic

Durathin Veneers

Invisalign

INeedSedation.com

 Readers Choice Award

 Readers Choice Award

 

Imagine this: An implant surgeon is performing a thorough examination of your mouth. The surgeon rotates your jaw from side to side and up and down, looking for the optimal sites in which to place dental implants — and the proper size, shape and orientation for the implants to have. He or she may test several alternatives, considering the underlying anatomical structures, and the bone density and quality that the examination reveals. Finally, a surgical plan is developed: This includes a set of precise specifications for implant position, size and depth, and a template for creating a perfectly fitting set of replacement teeth. But no invasive procedures of any type have been performed so far. In fact, you aren't even present.

Welcome to the world of computer-guided dental implant surgery. What we have described is one step in the process that allows you to receive a set of replacement teeth with the minimum amount of surgery (and time spent in the dental chair), and the maximum level of preplanning foresight. It can result in faster overall treatment time, less discomfort, and an outcome that pleases everyone. Let's look a little more closely at the entire process of computer-guided implant surgery — a procedure at the forefront of dental implant technology.

The First Phase: Making A Virtual Model

It all begins with a complete examination and modeling of your existing teeth, gum and jaw structures. In many cases, a physical impression (replica) of the jaws is made, which will aid in planning the location of the new teeth. But the modeling doesn't stop there: A high-tech, three-dimensional CT (computed tomography) scan is also performed. This allows us to examine the structures (including bone, nerve tissue and sinus cavities) which lieinside the jaw. It is often accomplished using “cone-beam” CT technology, in which the scanning device quickly captures a complete digital image of internal structures as it rotates around your head.

The next step of the process relies on powerful computers and sophisticated software to take the raw CT scan data and translate it into a 3-D model of the jaw. This virtual model can be manipulated on a computer screen — rotated, measured, even “operated” on — so that we can visualize the placement of dental implants and determine their optimum position with a high degree of accuracy. Using this technology, it's now possible for us to evaluate anatomical structures virtually — structures it once would have taken surgery to reveal — and to plan out the implant procedure accordingly.

The 3-D model we have developed is then used for two purposes: to create a precise guide for the implant surgery, and to allow the dental laboratory to pre-manufacture a set of replacement teeth that will fit precisely in the jaw. An advanced set of CAD/CAM (computer aided design/manufacture) processes is used to generate the physical objects — in this case, the surgical guide and the prosthetic teeth. Depending on your individual situation, the new teeth may be attached the same day as implant surgery, or after a healing period of 6 to 12 weeks. In either case, our precision modeling ensures that they will fit perfectly with the implants and the jaw.

Implant Surgery: Following the Plan

The implant surgery itself is typically performed under local anesthesia, and often requires no sutures (stitches). In the surgical procedure, the template we have produced (which resembles a nightguard or athletic mouthguard) is securely (but temporarily) fixed in position on the jaw. The openings in this template form precise guides for the placement of the implants — accurate in terms of position, width and depth. In fact, the implants fit so perfectly into these prepared sites that we can have new teeth placed the same day as implant surgery.

Since so many of the details have been accomplished in the planning stages, computer-guided implant surgery is typically uneventful for the patient. It can result in shorter time in the chair, less discomfort during recovery — and a highly pleasing result. It has even been called the most significant innovation in implant technology since osseointegration — the fundamental process by which a dental implant becomes fused with the bone.

anesthesia wand.If you've ever had needle phobia, you might like to learn about a new technology referred to as an “anesthesia wand,” which is a computer-controlled dental-injection tool. In fact, some people feel it is more of a “magic” wand because it doesn't look like a typical injection and it works even better by making the entire process virtually painless.

Here's how it works

Your anesthesia will be delivered through a syringe-free wand or pen-like device that is connected to a computer. Before the tiny needle attached to the wand is inserted, the computer delivers a small amount of anesthetic so that the insertion site starts going numb before the needle enters the skin.

Once the needle is in place, the computer delivers an accurate, consistent amount of anesthesia so that you remain comfortable — typically below the threshold of pain. The computer's microprocessor automatically adjusts the injection pressure for different tissue densities, maintaining a constant, comfortable flow of anesthesia. This is important because the culprit with most injection anxiety is discomfort from anesthetic being injected too quickly, not from the needle entering the skin.

What are some advantages of using an anesthesia wand?

  • One of the most important advantages is that it doesn't look threatening, as it eliminates the initial anxiety upon seeing a syringe.
  • It can be used in conjunction with other conscious sedation methods (i.e. nitrous oxide) for a more comfortable treatment.
  • It provides painless injections for all routine dental treatments including root canals, crowns, fillings, and cleanings.
  • With the wand, you will receive a more consistent and comfortable injection, especially in more sensitive areas such as the front of your mouth or in your palate (roof of your mouth) where tissue is less elastic.
  • Due to the wand's penlike grasp, it is easier to handle, rotate, and accurately glide the wand into precise, hard-to-reach places to deliver anesthetics.
  • Last but not least, many people who previously experienced a fear of injections are able to overcame their fear after the first use. This provides them with a better, less stressful dental experience.

Related Articles

Local Anesthesia - Dear Doctor Magazine

Local Anesthesia for Pain-Free Dentistry Local anesthesia is one of the most effective tools in dentistry and medicine. It is safe, effective and has totally revolutionized pain control. Without local anesthesia, some dental procedures would be quite stressful for all involved. It's good for you and for your dental professionals... Read Article

Oral Sedation Dentistry - Dear Doctor Magazine

Oral Sedation Dentistry Step out from under the shadow of fear and into the calm of sedation dentistry. There are safe and time-tested options available to ensure that you have a positive and painless dental experience. Your apprehension and hypersensitivity to pain melt away, yet you remain awake and in control... Read Article

Dental Fears - Dear Doctor Magazine

Overcoming Dental Fear & Anxiety Do you feel relatively calm before your dental appointment or are you a little nervous about a visit to the dental office? Do you worry about it days or weeks before the appointment? Are you actually terrified of it? Whichever end of this spectrum you might be on, you are not alone. It's possible, even for those who are the most afraid, to reduce that fear and to learn to have treatment in a way that feels calm and safe. Here's how... Read Article